GM maize pollutes rivers across the United States

From The Independent via GMWatch:

An insecticide used in genetically modified (GM) crops grown extensively in the United States and other parts of the world has leached into the water of the surrounding environment.

The insecticide is the product of a bacterial gene inserted into GM maize and other cereal crops to protect them against insects such as the European corn borer beetle. Scientists have detected the insecticide in a significant number of streams draining the great corn belt of the American mid-West.

It seems they have built-in the insecticide into the crop itself and somehow it has been washed out and ended up in the environment now polluting streams.
That makes me wonder: Aren’t we eating this built-in insecticide when we eat this stuff in any form whatsoever? I guess so, but I am sure it is completely safe and without any health hazard. Ha, ha.

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Pravda: Americans to Become Used to Drinking Russian Kvass

Bottled Kvas in Russia

Bottled Kvas in Russia

From Pravda.ru:

The famous producer of soft drinks Coca-Cola will sell  kvass under the trademark “Krushka & Bochka” (Mug & Barrel) , which is produced in Russian factories, in the  U.S. , according Bigness.ru.

The start of sales of the famous Russian drink is timed to the visit of Dmitry Medvedev to the country . Kvass will be sold in plastic bottles  of 0,5 liters. The new product can be purchased later this month in stores Whole Foods Market in New York. A bottle of the drink will cost about 2.5 dollars. Coca-Cola began production of kvass in Russia in 2008.

Today, Coca-Cola produces 500 brands of carbonated and still beverages, including Diet Coke, Fanta, Sprite, Coca-Cola Zero, Vitaminwater, Powerade, Minute Maid and Georgia Coffee.

That’s nice to know, but what is kvass anyway? From Wikipedia:

Kvass or kvas (borrowed from Russian квас (kvas) or from Polish kwas (meaning acid) in the 16th century), sometimes called in English a bread drink, is a fermented beverage made from black rye or rye bread  (which contributes to its light or dark colour). By the content of alcohol resulted from fermentation, it is classified as non-alcoholic: up to 1.2% of alcohol, according to the standard of Russia.

It’s still – or again – very popular in Russia, again from Wikipedia:

Although western soft drinks such as Coca-Cola  and Pepsi  previously smothered the commercial sale of kvass in Russia, currently kvass is being marketed as a patriotic alternative to cola, sparking a recent “kvass revival.” For example, the Russian company Nikola (whose name sounds like “not cola” in Russian) has promoted its brand of kvass with an advertising campaign emphasizing “anti cola-nisation.” Moscow-based Business Analytica reported in 2008 that bottled kvass sales had tripled since 2005 and estimated that per-capita  consumption of kvass in Russia would reach three liters in 2008.

The news release from Coca Cola can be found here.